Tower of London | History & Facts

Tower of London by the name "the Tower the Royal Fortress in the city of London, and a London landmark.

Tower of London | History & Facts

Tower of London by the name "the Tower the Royal Fortress in the city of London, and a London landmark. Its grounds and buildings were used historically as a palace of the royal family and a prison for political purposes and a place of execution and an arsenal and an official mint, a menagerie as well as a public records bureau. It is situated on the northern bank of the River Thames, in the west-most part of the Borough in Tower Hamlets, on the boundary to the Central City of London.

After the coronation (Christmas 1066), William I the Conqueror began erecting fortifications around the site to be able to dominate the local mercantile community. He also wanted to restrict access to the Upper Pool of London, the main port area prior to the building of docks further downstream in the 19th century. The central keep, also known in the name of"the White Tower" White Tower --was begun about 1078, close to the Roman city wall. It was constructed of lime from Caen located in Normandy. In the 13th and 12th centuries, the fortifications grew beyond that of the walls, with the White Tower becoming the nucleus of a set of concentric defenses that enclosed an inner and outer ward.

The inside "curtain" comprises 13 towers that surround the White Tower, of which the most well-known are The Bloody Tower, the Beauchamp Tower along with the Wakefield Tower. The outer curtain is enclosed by a moat that was run via the Thames but then drained in 1843. The wall that surrounds the moat is lined with embrasures for cannons. alongside them, artillery pieces from the present are fired in a ceremony on official occasions. The entire complex is spread over 18 acres (7 acres). The only access to the land is in the southwest corner, away from the City time when the river was an important route for London the watergate of the 13th century was frequently utilized. Its name, Traitors' Gate, is derived from the prisoners who were brought through it to the White Tower which was utilized as a prison for the state. The armories are now housed in this part of the White Tower, as well as a brick structure that is adjacent, housing arms, and armor dating from the beginning of the Middle Ages to modern times. A large portion of the armory, managed by The Royal Armouries, was moved to a new site for the museum in Leeds in the year 1996.

The Tower was a residence of the royal family up to the 17th century and until the 13th century, up to 1834, it was home to the Royal Menagerie (the Lion Tower). It was during the Middle Ages the Tower of London was transformed into a prison as well as a place of execution for those who committed politically related crimes, with many prisoners being executed (murdered or executed) in Tower Green or Tower Green or, outside the castle, publicly in the open on Tower Hill. Some of those executed there was Sir Simon Burley (in 1388) who was a tutor and adviser to Richard II; the statesman Edmund Dudley (1510); Sir Thomas More, a humanist Thomas More (1535); the second wife of Henry VIII, Anne Boleyn (1536) as well as Lady Jane Grey and her husband the Lord Guildford Dudley (1554); and the 11th Lord Lovat, Simon Fraser (1747) who had been the Scottish Jacobite chief. The place was a target of spies during World War I several spies were executed in the city by firing squads. Some notable prisoners were Princess Elizabeth (later Elizabeth I) who was briefly detained for a short time by Mary I for suspicion of conspiracy as well as the conspirator and soldier Guy Fawkes; the adventurer Sir Walter Raleigh; and Sir Roger Casement, who was detained for treason in World War I. In 1483, the adolescent King Edward V and his younger brother were last seen at the Tower prior to their disappearance and possible murder.

In the years prior to 1994, the British Crown Jewels as well as regalia remained inside the underground Jewel House; they are now in a more expansive aboveground facility. The 1990s saw restoration work completed across the Tower including the medieval buildings located in Wakefield in the Wakefield and St. Thomas's towers.

A garrison for the military is located inside the Tower and, together with its precincts is a "liberty" that is not subject to local authorities. It is governed by its sovereign through a constable who is also an official of the field. There is a governor who lives there who is located in the 16th century Queen's House on Tower Green and oversees the yeoman-style warders, which are also known as "beefeaters," as they are often referred to. They are still wearing the Tudor uniform and reside in the Tower and are responsible for their duties. They include leading tours for the Tower's 2 million to 3 million visitors annually. Ravens who have clipped wings are maintained on the grounds by the yeoman yeoman-raven master. A tradition dating back to the reign of King Charles II (reigned 1660-85) states that, should ravens flee the Tower the fortification would be destroyed as well as the entire state will be destroyed. The fortress that lies in this point, the Tower there is Tower Bridge (1894) The sole central-city bridge crossing the Thames beneath London Bridge. The fortress was declared a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1988.

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